Pro Scooters | Good entry level beginner scooters

Updated 3/25/2017!

First and foremost, I wanted to thank all the customers that have visited our site and/or our shop!  We love the scooter sport!

We get a lot of questions in our Redmond, WA, scooter shop about the best entry level scooters.  A good question so thought it would be good to provide some input.  Let's start with defining what 'entry level' or beginner scooter means.

We define a 'pro scooter' as having these characteristics:

  • Metal core wheels - can be solid core, honeycomb or spoked.  Just as long as they're metal
  • Sealed bearings in the wheels and the headset
  • Solid state - meaning they don't fold up, the bars don't adjust

Most of the time, this question comes from the parent/parents of the younger riders, say 9-12 years old, with little or no scooter experience.  For the most part, the entry level scooters are capable of performing the same tricks as the mid- and higher end scooters.  The difference can be in the size of the bars, usually lower (shorter) and not as wide (for the shorter arms on younger riders).

Another difference is usually the scooter wheel size, which is generally 100m on the entry levels.  The larger scooter wheels, 110m, offer a little more speed and higher clearance from the ground to the scooter deck.   The wheels can be customized, allowing the entry level rider to make simple changes that set their scooter apart from their friend's scooters.

pro scooter size chart

Let's talk about prices.  No surprise, but the entry level scooters are less expensive than higher end scooters.  But that doesn't mean less quality. The decks are rugged and have great looking designs.  Some brands even come with a 'sticker pack' so your rider can customize his or her scooter.  Bars and grips are also well made and look good, but again, these can be customized (replaced) on most scooters.

Pro Scooter Shop carries beginner scooters that range from $99 to $159.  I would recommend the following options for the new rider:

Arriving in our shop is the Envy One, based off of the Envy Colt (see below).  We've seen a 2-piece handle bar, and frankly, didn't love them.  But Envy did it right with their design.  We've built quite a few...pretty dang solid little whip!  $129.95 feel right.

 

For the very young shredder, the AO Disciple is solid, light-weight with bars that fit their shoulder width and height.  Don't let the size fool you, it is still considered a pro scooter!  Metal core wheels, sealed bearings, solid-state, non-adjustable bars.

 

 

Phoenix is an industry favorite, and their Pilot is just right for the transition-to-pro-scooter riding.  Includes a head tube badge, new fork and 110mm wheels. With a 4.25" wide and 19" long deck, the Phoenix Pilot is well balanced for stomping out tailwhips. The 22 inch tall, 20 inch wide T-style bars are a solid size for growing riders and are fully upgradeable.

 

 

 

Madd GearVX7 Pro, or MGP scooters.  The 'pro' edition (yes, it is confusing that Madd Gear Pro scooters has a pro edition) is very popular, a great looking scooter and well priced.  This is are most popular entry level pro scooter!

My recommendation for a similar scooter is the Envy Colt; see below.

 

Another great entry level comes from Grit Scooters.  the Grit Fluxx scooter!  Cool name, great price and a sharp looking ride!  This is one of my favorite scooters. 

 

 

A slightly more expensive entry level, but killer scooter from Australia, the Envy Colt.  Cleaner design, solid scooter.  Worth a look.

To round out the beginner pro scooter list, Grit Scooters has two, the Extremist ($99) and the Atom ($79).  Keep in mind these are small scooters for the smaller riders.

 

 

 

 

Dominator rolled into the scooter scene a few years ago.  Fun colors, fairly solid scooters, well-like by the young crowd.  We're bringing back one of their models, the Trooper, cuz quite frankly for $99, it's a decent sled.

 

 

 

One last thought. As a scooter shop owner, I'd love to 'upsell' you to the next level scooter.  As a parent of three kids, I wouldn't spend more on an upgraded scooter until I knew my kids really enjoyed scootering and grew with the sport.

Hope this helps!

Pro Scooter Shop

December 02, 2016 by David Power
Older Post